Nonprofit Bounces Back Better After Two Breaches In A Year
Like many other community organizations, a Colorado-based nonprofit relies on federal contracts for a large portion of its annual funding. The staff focuses on serving people with disabilities and other barriers to employment — not cybersecurity. When two data breaches happened in a single year, there was no central IT leader to take control of the situation. The nonprofit’s cyber insurance was at risk and, without it, vital federal funding could be lost.

The nonprofit’s broker turned things around by steering towards SecondSight. 

SecondSight took the burden off the nonprofit’s leadership — as well as its broker.  After a complete digital asset inventory, including multiple SaaS implementations, SecondSight verified the risk controls that were in place and collected the necessary evidence. At the same time, SecondSight identified critical risk control gaps that could be remediated ahead of renewals. 

Finally understanding the scope of its digital risk, the nonprofit knew it needed more help. 

By translating technical terms into more meaningful financial language, SecondSight helped the nonprofit understand its digital environment for the first time. And with a clear outline of the critical risk control gaps, It was much easier for leadership to bring in an MSP to start repairing its insurability. 

The result? The broker and MSP can work on securing renewal, and the nonprofit can do what they do best. 

With its IT under control and the MSP taking all necessary steps to improve its risk profile, the nonprofit is in a much better position to maintain its cyber coverage and crucial funding. And when renewal time comes around, the MSP and organizational leadership can leverage SecondSight to answer all underwriting questions and provide valuable evidence of its breach recovery progress.

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Like many other community organizations, a Colorado-based nonprofit relies on federal contracts for a large portion of its annual funding. The staff focuses on serving people with disabilities and other barriers to employment — not cybersecurity. When two data breaches happened in a single year, there was no central IT leader to take control of the situation. The nonprofit’s cyber insurance was at risk and, without it, vital federal funding could be lost.
A serious cyber event was the last thing a digitally driven manufacturer needed. Especially when that event causes a shutdown at two different plants. Operations were effectively restored, but the conditions that allowed the breach still existed. With large contracts requiring cyber insurance to help ensure Just-in-Time delivery, the firm now faced another looming threat — the very-real possibility of losing coverage and jeopardizing those big contracts.