Specialty Manufacturer Rebuilds Insurability After A Serious Attack
A serious cyber event was the last thing a digitally driven manufacturer needed. Especially when that event causes a shutdown at two different plants. Operations were effectively restored, but the conditions that allowed the breach still existed. With large contracts requiring cyber insurance to help ensure Just-in-Time delivery, the firm now faced another looming threat — the very-real possibility of losing coverage and jeopardizing those big contracts.

The firm’s MSP kicked off a powerful comeback with SecondSight   

SecondSight’s easy-to-use automated tools and workflows quickly inventoried all digital assets across multiple facilities and found the critical risk control gaps that led to the breach and could jeopardize insurability. These efforts also revealed total digital risk costs of at least $10M — and potentially as high as $28M. 

 

Understanding the cost of digital risk helped decisionmakers prioritize MSP efforts. 

With SecondSight, firm leadership could see and understand the full business impact of the missing risk controls for the first time. Working with its broker and MSP, the manufacturer created a strategic remediation plan to protect business continuity and improve the firm’s overall risk profile. 

 

The result? No more renewal dread. And a much more secure future. 

All existing risk controls were verified through SecondSight, with the appropriate evidence to satisfy underwriters. As new risk controls get added, SecondSight can verify and collect the evidence necessary to demonstrate those improvements. The manufacturer, its broker and the MSP can rest easy, knowing they’ve done everything possible to ensure business continuity and protect the firm’s cyber coverage and vital contracts.  

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A serious cyber event was the last thing a digitally driven manufacturer needed. Especially when that event causes a shutdown at two different plants. Operations were effectively restored, but the conditions that allowed the breach still existed. With large contracts requiring cyber insurance to help ensure Just-in-Time delivery, the firm now faced another looming threat — the very-real possibility of losing coverage and jeopardizing those big contracts.