SecondSight activates a robust cyber hygiene strategy
A leading US logistics company has substantial client contracts that mandate cyber insurance, in order to protect sensitive data and mission-critical timelines. As the cyber market has tightened, however, the firm’s broker anticipated a much tougher time renewing its coverage at optimal levels and cost.

Broker Introduced SecondSight to Streamline and Improve Cyber Renewal Readiness  

SecondSight is designed to make it easier for organizations to prepare for cyber underwriting and improve their likelihood of obtaining favorable terms. 

Requiring minimal effort from the broker or the logistics Company, SecondSight quickly discovered and inventoried all digital assets, both on premise and in the cloud, and verified adherence to the top cyber risk controls required by major carriers. Through that process, SecondSight identified certain risk control gaps that could be strategically addressed ahead of renewals. And finally, SecondSight made it easy to collect and deliver the evidence underwriters need to have confidence in the risk story. 

 

The result? Better business continuity. And an unimpeachable renewal submission. 

With a clearer and more comprehensive view of its overall digital risk, the logistics firm’s IT team was able to target risk remediation efforts strategically. As efforts progressed, overall recoverability and insurability were measurably improved. At renewal time, the company and its broker will have everything they need to answer underwriting questions confidently and make a strong case for optimal cyber coverage. .

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